September Home Update – When Flooding Occurs

When Flooding Occurs 

You don’t need to live near a body of water to be concerned about flooding in your home.  You’ve got hundreds of gallons of water pumping through the pipes in your walls and floors.  In fact, the most common form of household water damage is that caused by plumbing leaks and appliance failures (toilet flooding, a leaking refrigerator, burst plumbing pipes, etc).

When flooding occurs, the key to protecting your property is to act quickly and tackle the following ten steps:

1- Stop the flow of water: If the water is coming from an appliance or a plumbing pipe inside your home, use one of the main shutoff valves to cut all water flowing to the house.  If the water is coming from outside your home, try to redirect the water elsewhere (if you don’t have sandbags, fill garbage bags full of dirt from your yard).

2- Turn off the electricity: When water comes into contact with electricity, it can electrocute anyone who touches the water.

3- Collect the water: Use any/all towels, sheets, and other linens to get water off the floors.  If it’s draining from pipes or through ceilings, use buckets to contain it.

4- Gather valuables: Designate someone to gather all valuables while the others contain the flooding.

5- Wear protective gear: Put on rubber boots and gloves to protect yourself from polluted water.

6- Consider leaving the premises: If sewage or chemicals are in the water, live electrical wires are underwater, or the level of water is above your ankles, it’s best to evacuate the house.

7- Call for assistance: Call 911 if you need immediate medical assistance.  Call your landlord if you’re a renter.  Call your insurance company if you’re the owner of the home.

8- Document the damage: Once the situation is under control and everyone is out of danger, but before any major clean up or repair work begins, take photos of the damage done to your home, as well as any belongings damaged during the flooding.  Your insurance company will want a record of this.

9- Start the restoration: Cleanup from flooding should begin within 24 hours.  If the water soaked your sheetrock walls or the sub-flooring (the wood below your flooring), call a professional restoration company that specializes in water cleanups.  If the damage is less extensive than that:

  • Remove any water-soaked carpeting.  Carpet is a breeding ground for mold.
  • Quickly dry or discard cardboard and paper that was water-soaked to avoid mold infestation.
  • Rent floor fans and use them to help dry the flooded area.
  • Rent, borrow or buy a portable dehumidifier and use it in combination with the fans.
  • Use a bleach solution to sanitize furniture and hard surfaces.

10- Watch for mold: Monitor walls, ceilings, floors, and belongings for the appearance of black spots.  A musty smell is another sign of mold.  Signs of mold exposure include itchy, watery eyes, runny/blocked nose, sore throat, sneezing, headaches and respiratory issues.

 

To respond promptly, you’ll need to know ahead of time where the main water and electricity shut-offs are located.  This is something everyone who lives in your home should be shown as soon as possible.  The main electrical panel is usually housed in a gray metal box attached to the wall in your basement, or in a utility closet.  Typically, there’s one switch inside the box that cuts all power to all other switches.  Most homes have two main water shutoffs.  One is in a box in the ground in front of your home.  And the other, typically, has a handle attached to a thick plumbing pipe inside your basement or utility closet.

 

Source: Windermere Home Update

Posted on September 12, 2019 at 9:15 am
Melissa Tetz | Category: Uncategorized | Tagged , , , , , , , ,